EL ARTE DE LA FUGA DE SERGIO PITOL PDF

El arte de la fuga has ratings and 26 reviews. Oscar said: Cuando se habla de los grandes escritores latinoamericanos de la generación del boom se ha. Sergio Pitol has books on Goodreads with ratings. Sergio Pitol’s most popular book is El arte de la fuga. El arte de la fuga (Biblioteca Era) (Spanish Edition) eBook: Sergio Pitol: Amazon. : Kindle Store.

Author: Vudolabar Kazrami
Country: China
Language: English (Spanish)
Genre: Health and Food
Published (Last): 28 April 2011
Pages: 198
PDF File Size: 6.91 Mb
ePub File Size: 13.2 Mb
ISBN: 615-7-65641-915-8
Downloads: 51042
Price: Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader: Dazahn

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — El arte de la fuga by Sergio Pitol. The debut work in English by Mexico’s greatest and most influential living author and winner of the Cervantes Prize “the Spanish language Nobel”The Art of Flight takes the reader on a whirlwind tour of the world’s cultural capitals as Sergio Pitol looks back on his well-traveled life as a legendary author, translator, scholar, and diplomat.

The first work in Pitol’s “Tr The debut work in English by Mexico’s greatest and most influential living author and winner of the Cervantes Prize “the Spanish language Nobel”The Art of Flight takes the reader on a whirlwind tour of the world’s cultural capitals as Sergio Pitol looks back on his well-traveled life as a legendary author, translator, scholar, and diplomat.

The first work in Pitol’s “Trilogy of Memory,” The Art of Flight imaginatively blends the genres of fiction and memoir in a Borgesian swirl of contemplation and mystery, expanding our understanding and appreciation of what literature can be and what it can do.

Paperbackpages. Published May 28th by Ediciones Era first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about El arte de la fugaplease sign up. Lists with This Book.

Rara vez se habla de Sergio Pitol. Es una verdadera pena. Un escritor olvidado, de trabajos olvidados, conocido en gran parte solamente por el mundillo ds y literario. A Pitol hay que leerlo. Y hay que leerlo no solamente por conocer su trabajo, o por sus reconocimientos y premios.

Hay que leerlo simplemente porque leer a Pitol es una delicia, un verdadero agasajo. Y El Arte de la Fuga es probablemente un buen lugar para empezar a leerlo si no se ha hecho. View all 6 comments.

I have been holding this back thinking I was going to right a review worthy of the book, but life has intervened. Just about anything you buy from them will be a good investment.

No, this is something different, something a tad on the painful side, but mostly pleasurable in nature. I love this feeling. I want to make it last for as long as I can. Beware the side effects. How am I supposed accurately describe the contents of this book to people? I feel that other kind of more traditional headache muscling its way in as I agonize over this very thought. Surely there has to be a way though? He calls Pitol “the greatest Spanish-language writer of our time,” says he has a “passion for confusing life and literature,” and that the crucial marker of his style is the idea of “fleeing anyone who is so dreadful as to be full of certainty.

Pitol does confuse life and literature, or rather, he is immersed in literary imagining, and his mind is populated mainly b The Literary Life as a Cocoon I bought this the moment I saw Vila-Matas had written an introduction.

Pitol does confuse life and literature, or rather, he is immersed in literary imagining, and his mind is populated mainly by the names and lives of hundreds of authors. In that it’s like Vila-Matas’s “Dublinesque” and his other books.

El Arte de La Fuga

But an indifferently veiled autobiography of the author whose imagination consists entirely of other authors is not an easy subject. One thing it requires, I would think, is real engagement with the ghosts, the literary voices, the contemporaries. Pitol is safe inside his world of authors: In fact the novels Pitol has read seem barely to talk to him except in generalities and stray remembered quotations that serve more as decorations than insights, and this novel’s philosophic moments are mainly asides that come up when Pitol has a temporary respite from the continuous rain of thoughts about publishing, fame or its absence, literary lineages, schools, manners, communities, and histories.

  CONSTRUDATA 2009 PDF

This is the literary life as cocoon. Sometimes the threads of an author’s cocoon can be so fine, so capacious, that they seem like the air itself. The cocoon seems to disappear, and the author imagines himself in touch with the raw world itself. But this is not life, this is embalmed and becalmed and proof against any intrusion. Pitol reminds me, in that respect, of the late Bellow, so warmed by his self-regard and the praise of the friends and readers he’d chosen.

The book opens with some awful pages about Venice, in which the narrator rehearses all sorts of commonplaces about the city: May 30, Guillermo Gonca rated it liked it. I’m really far away from the cultural reference point of this book – lots of whole long essays on books I’ve never heard of by authors I’ve never heard of – but it a well-written, fun read.

Sergio Pitol, who I admit I’ve never heard of, was maybe an insightful thinker and maybe a wonderful novelist, but to me this “memoir” wasn’t a great read. For one, marketing it as a book that “defies genre” is simply a cover for what felt like a hodgepodge of totally miscellaneous writing diaries, articles on literature, some travelogues, some misc.

If you’re reading this book to gain insight on the life of Pitol, you Sergio Pitol, who I admit I’ve never heard of, was maybe an insightful thinker and maybe a wonderful novelist, but to me this “memoir” wasn’t a great read. If you’re reading this book to gain insight on the life of Pitol, you’re likely to be disappointed.

Books by Sergio Pitol (Author of El arte de la fuga)

Besides a few episodic notes from his travels in Poland, Spain and Italy, there isn’t much introspection into Pitol as a character – more his musings on Mexican and European culture. Furthermore, much of the literary articles are focused on works that are too obscure to the American reader to make sense of or appreciate in any meaningful way. There’s one short essay about the development of his ideas for his novel Love Parade – but of course that is not published in English, so it was of little value in relation to my readerly life.

I really enjoyed this book, but I’m not sure what to say about it or how to review it probably. Its writing feels musical and in fact, the spanish word “fuga” translates to both ‘flight’ and ‘fugue’, as the translator’s afterward points out.

Its certainly not for everyone, but the people that will be drawn to it will likely love it. Its soft and gentle in a way, and it meanders like a river or a long walk does. Some of the sections disguise itself as literary criticism, so if you don’t enjoy cr I really enjoyed this book, but I’m not sure what to say about it or how to review it probably. Some of the sections disguise itself as literary criticism, so if you don’t enjoy criticism, you might not like it.

But even in these sections, it feels both intensely personal and also slightly mysterious and dreamlike. I picked the book up, almost on accident, after finishing Don Quixote. I hadn’t heard of it, but saw it won the Cervantes Prize, so I thought it would be an appropriate book to follow that read. I have to admit it took me a while to start it though. It presents itself as a memoir, but its a creative and “literary” memoir, and therefor should not be read as an autobiography.

  CASIO SGW-100B MANUAL PDF

There are not many events — but there are many themes. His writings on memory somewhat reminded me of WG Sebald, although I’m not sure if that’s an appropriate comparison. The style and writing itself seems soft, blissful, and musical.

The text flows like water. Each chapter contains the date it was written, and the result is sort of a collage of journal entries, placed out of order. It is divided into four bigger sections. It will inevitably add a long list of books you want to read to your list. Pitol is passionate about reading, was a translator, and writes about literature as ds as he writes about his life. The most touching story, for me, was about his fl a hypnotist.

There are many stylistic shifts in the book, but they are unified by his voice.

This book is the first of a “trilogy of memory” and they are all being translated by George Hensen and published by Deep Vellum. Picking up this book was a discovery for me of the translator and publisher as well as the writer. Deep Vellum is a non profit based in Texas.

Hensen, who I had never heard of, did a great job with the translation — the language works well in English, and I feel a poetry to the movement that reminds me of other translators I love Chris Andrews and Margeret Jill-Costa.

I do not read any other language than English, so my assumptions on what makes a good translator might be inaccurate, and at the least aren’t informed of the nuances of its craft. However, I’ve definitely noticed liking some translators more than others, particularly when reading widely translated writers. I am very excited to have just learned about him, grateful he is starting to be translated while simultaneously disappointed he wasn’t translated until now. Both this book and Roberto Bolano’s Between Parenthesis discuss a novel Pitol wrote that I really, really, really hope gets translated next.

First of all, it’s a lovely book, masterful in every respect I also appreciate the way time is dealt with throughout, and the way you can see Pitol’s mind working Pitol puts you in mind of a good companion and you can often disagree with him but he not only talks, he listens Readers of Spanish language fiction would know of the Miguel de Cervantes Prize. The Miguel de Cervantes Prize was created inalthough the first award was made in The candidates are nominated by the Spanish Royal Academy, by the Academies in Spanish-speaking countries and by former prize-winners.

The chairman of the jury is the Spanish Minister of Culture and sinceit can only be awarded to a single candidate. How to review what is basically a notebook? Life, fiction, memories, and readings intertwine in this book with astonishing ease, and the result is a volume that reads like a novel. With a short introduction by friend and fellow Spanish language writer Enrique Vila-Matas, the work begins with Pitol travelling and misplacing his glasses, he is in Venice, blurry eyed with mists descending.

Within a couple of pages you know that the theme of a blurry memory, shadows, snippets is about to pervade throughout For my full review go to http: The Art of Flight is the first of three memoirs by the Mexican writer Sergio Pitol, and the first of any of his books to be translated quite ably into English.

Fortunately, however, we are meeting Pitol. Pitol, Aira, and Vila-Matas are writers who could turn a description of a sidewalk crack into a Scheherazadean fugue.